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Of Consequence
Vox Populi Gallery, Philadelphia, PA _December 5th, 2015- January 10th, 2016
press release
 
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Exhibition Overview: Of Consequence
Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin
Graphite on BFK RIVES Paper
122” x 92”
Vox Populi Gallery, Dec 2015- Jan 2016
 
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Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin (detail)
Graphite on BFK RIVES Paper
122” x 92”
 
 
 
Exhibition Overview: Of Consequence
Vox Populi Gallery, Dec 2015- Jan 2016
 
 
 
J. Edgar Hoover, Double
Graphite on Panel with Mirror
16“ x 22“
2015

Book on mirror: Crime and Punishment , 1866
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Nov. 1821 – Feb.1881)
Note: This novel focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Raskolnikov, an impoverished ex-student in St. Petersburg who formulates and executes a plan to kill an unscrupulous pawnbroker for her cash. Raskolnikov, in attempts to defend his actions, argues that with the pawnbroker's money he can perform good deeds to counterbalance the crime, while ridding the world of a vermin. He also commits the murder to test a theory of his that dictates some people are naturally capable of such actions, and even have the right to perform them. Several times throughout the novel, Raskolnikov compares himself with Napoleon Bonaparte and shares his belief that murder is permissible in pursuit of a higher purpose.
 
 
 
J. Edgar Hoover, Double
Graphite on Panel with Mirror
16“ x 22“
2015
Note: The Thatcher effect or Thatcher illusion is a phenomenon where it becomes more difficult to detect local feature changes in an upside-down face, despite identical changes being obvious in an upright face. The effect was originally created by Psychology Professor Peter Thompson in 1980.
 
 
 
Found book: The World Set Free: A Story of Mankind , 1914
H.G. Wells
Note: This book is based on a prediction of nuclear weapons of a more destructive and uncontrollable sort than the world had yet to see.
 
 
 
95 ID Badges from Project Y at Los Alamos
Graphite on Panel
12.5“ x 35“
2015
Note: A collection of physicists, mathematicians, chemists, metallurgists, physicians, engineers, technicians, secretaries, librarians, housekeepers, cleaners, nurses, laborers, and other people who are necessary to make a nuclear bomb.
 
 
 
95 ID Badges from Project Y at Los Alamos (detail)
Graphite on Panel
12.5“ x 35“
2015
 
 
 
The Gadget
Graphite on Panel
3“ x 4”
2015
Note: “Trinity” was the code name of the first detonation of a nuclear weapon, conducted by the United States Army on July 16, 1945, as part of the Manhattan Project. The code name "Trinity" was assigned by J. Robert Oppenheimer, the director of the Los Alamos Laboratory, inspired by the poetry of John Donne. The test was of an implosion-design plutonium device, informally nicknamed "The Gadget", of the same design as the Fat Man bomb later detonated over Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9, 1945.
 
 
 
 
Exhibition Overview: Of Consequence
Vox Populi Gallery, Dec 2015- Jan 2016
 
 
 
Exhibition Overview: Of Consequence
Vox Populi Gallery, Dec 2015- Jan 2016
 
 
 

The Origins of Modern Computing
Graphite on Panel
10“ x 9“
2015

Note: Persons depicted, start top left: Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace, Alan Turing, John V. Atanasoff, Konrad Zuse, John von Neumann, Nathaniel Rochester, John W. Mauchly, J.Presper Eckert, Dennis Ritchie, Chuck Peddle, André Truong Trong Thi, Henry Edward "Ed" Roberts, Dick Morley, Masatoshi Shima, Jon Bosak, Marcian Hoff, John Backus, Alan Cooper, Alan Emtage, Vic Hayes, Charles Goldfarb, Vinod Dham, Tim Berners-Lee, Vince Cerf, and Bob Kahn.

 
 
 
Book: Turing's Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe
2012
George Dyson
Note: A book about how the digital universe exploded in the aftermath of World War II, Dyson illuminates the nature of digital computers, the lives of those who brought them into existence, and how code took over the world. In the 1940s and ‘50s, a small group of men and women—led by John von Neumann—gathered in Princeton, New Jersey, to begin building one of the first computers to realize Alan Turing’s vision of a Universal Machine. The codes unleashed broke the distinction between numbers that mean things and numbers that do things, and our universe would never be the same. Turing’s Cathedral is the story of how the most constructive and most destructive of twentieth-century inventions—the digital computer and the hydrogen bomb—emerged at the same time.
 
 
 
IAS Computer the precursor to the MANIAC
Graphite on Panel
3“ x 4“
2015
Note: The IAS machine was the first electronic computer built at the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS), in Princeton, New Jersey, USA. It is sometimes called the von Neumann machine, since the paper describing its design was edited by John von Neumann, a mathematics professor at both Princeton University and IAS. The computer was built from late 1945 until 1951 under his direction. The general organization is called Von Neumann architecture, even though it was both conceived and implemented by others. The MANIAC (Mathematical Analyzer, Numerical Integrator, and Computer or Mathematical Analyzer, Numerator, Integrator, and Computer) was an early computer built under the direction of Nicholas Metropolis at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. It was based on the von Neumann architecture of the IAS, developed by John von Neumann.
 
 
 
 
Nils Als Bariecelli
Graphite on Panel
4“ x 3“
2015
Note: Barricelli's early computer-assisted experiments in symbiogenesis and evolution are considered pioneering in artificial life research. Barricelli, who was independently wealthy, held an unpaid residency at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey in 1953, 1954, and 1956.
 
 
 
 

Magazine on shelf: Cabinet Magazine, Issue 42
Forgetting
Summer 2011
Opened to article: Creative Evolution by Alexander R. Galloway
Note: An short article explaining Nils Aall Barricelli’s mathematical organisms.

 
 
 
Edward Snowden
Graphite on Panel
16“ x 22“
2015 Price on Request
Note: Snowden is a computer professional, former CIA employee, and former government contractor who copied classified information from the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) and UK Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) for public disclosure in 2013. The information revealed numerous global surveillance programs, many run by the NSA and Five Eyes with the cooperation of telecommunication companies and European governments. On June 21, 2013, the U.S. Department of Justice unsealed charges against Snowden of two counts of violating the Espionage Act and theft of government property. On June 23, he flew to Moscow, Russia, where he has remained living in an undisclosed location in Russia while seeking asylum elsewhere.
 
 
 
Edward Snowden (detail)
Graphite on Panel
16“ x 22“
2015 Price on Request
 
 
 

Book on shelf: The Adolescent, 1875
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Nov. 1821 – Feb.1881)
Note: The novel chronicles the life of 19-year-old intellectual, Arkady Dolgoruky, A focus of the novel is the recurring conflict between father and son, particularly in ideology, which represents the battles between the conventional "old" way of thinking in the 1840s and the new nihilistic point of view of the youth of 1860s Russia. Another main theme is Arkady's development and utilization of his "idea" in his life, mainly a form of rebellion against society (and his father) through the rejection of attending a university, and the making of money and living independently, onto the eventual aim of becoming excessively wealthy and powerful.


Magazine on shelf: Foreign Polisy
The Golden Age of Surveillance
June 2015

 
 
 

Grigori Rasputin and Generals
Graphite on Panel
10“ x 9“
2015

Book on shelf: Brothers Karamazov, 1880
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Nov. 1821 – Feb.1881)
Note: This book is a passionate philosophical novel set in 19th century Russia, that enters deeply into the ethical debates of God, free will, and morality. It is a spiritual drama of moral struggles concerning faith, doubt, judgement, and reason, set against a modernizing Russia, with a plot which revolves around the subject of patricide.

 
 
 
Grigori Rasputin and Generals
Graphite on Panel
10“ x 9“
2015
Note: Rasputin (January 1869 – December 1916 ) was a Russian peasant, mystical faith healer and a trusted friend to the family of Nicholas II, the last Tsar of Russia. He became an influential figure in Saint Petersburg, especially after August 1915 when Nicholas took command of the army at the front.
 
 
 

Russian Coat of Arms
Graphite on Panel
4“ x 3“
2015

Deep Blue vs. Garry Kasparov
Graphite on Panel
6“ x 10”
2015

Book on shelf: The Double, 1846 and The Gambler, 1866
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Nov. 1821 – Feb.1881)

 
 
 
Russian Coat of Arms
Graphite on Panel
4“ x 3“
2015
Note: The two-headed eagle is the coat of arms of the Russian Federation. It derives from the earlier coat of arms of the Russian Empire which was abolished with the Russian Revolution in 1917 and restored in 1993 after the constitutional crisis.
 
 
 
Deep Blue vs. Garry Kasparov
Graphite on Panel
6“ x 10”
2015
Note: Deep Blue vs. Garry Kasparov was a pair of six-game chess matches between chess champion Garry Kasparov and an IBM supercomputer called Deep Blue. The first match was played in Philadelphia in 1996 and won by Kasparov. The second was played in New York City in 1997 and won by Deep Blue. The 1997 match was the first defeat of a reigning world chess champion to a computer under tournament conditions.
 
 
 
Book on shelf: The Double, 1846 and The Gambler, 1866
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Nov. 1821 – Feb.1881)
Note: The Double (1846) is a surprisingly modern hallucinatory nightmare in which a minor official named Goliadkin becomes aware of a mysterious doppelganger, a man who has his name and his face and who gradually and relentlessly begins to displace him with his friends and colleagues. The Gambler (1866) is a stunning psychological portrait of a young man's exhilarating and destructive addiction to gambling, a compulsion that Dostoevsky–who once gambled away his young wife's wedding ring–knew intimately from his own experience. In chronicling the disastrous love affairs and gambling adventures of Alexei Ivanovich, Dostoevsky explores the irresistible temptation to look into the abyss of ultimate risk that he believed was an essential part of the Russian national character.
 
 
 
Pussy Riot, Punk Prayer: Mother of God, Chase Putin Away
Graphite on Panel
9“ x 10“

Book on Shelf: Demons, 1871-72
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Nov. 1821 – Feb.1881)
 
 
 
Pussy Riot, Punk Prayer: Mother of God, Chase Putin Away
Graphite on Panel
9“ x 10“
2015
Note: On 21 February 2012, five members of the group Pussy Riot staged a performance on the soleas of Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Savior. Their actions were stopped by church security officials. By evening, they had turned it into a music video entitled "Punk Prayer - Mother of God, Chase Putin Away!". The women said their protest was directed at the Orthodox Church leader's support for Putin during his election campaign.
 
 
 
Book on Shelf: Demons, 1871-72
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Nov. 1821 – Feb.1881)
Note: Demons is an allegory of the potentially catastrophic consequences of the political and moral nihilism that were becoming prevalent in Russia in the 1860s. A fictional Russian town descends into chaos as it becomes the focal point of an attempted revolution, orchestrated by master conspirator Pyotr Verkhovensky.
 
 
 

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Graphite on Panel
4“ x 3“
2015

Book on Shelf (top): Notes from Underground, 1864
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Nov. 1821 – Feb.1881)

Book on Shelf (bottom): Notes from a Dead House, 1864
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Nov. 1821 – Feb.1881)

Headphones: playing Part I of Notes from Underground, 1864
Note: To be listed to while viewing the drawing Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin

 
 
 

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Graphite on Panel
4“ x 3“
2015

 
 
 

Book on Shelf (top): Notes from Underground, 1864
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Nov. 1821 – Feb.1881)
Note: This novella (also translated as Notes from the Underground or Letters from the Underworld) is considered by many to be the first existentialist novel. It presents itself as an excerpt from the rambling memoirs of a bitter, isolated, unnamed narrator (generally referred to by critics as the Underground Man) who is a retired civil servant living in St. Petersburg. The first part of the story is told in monologue form, or the underground man's diary, and attacks emerging Western philosophy, especially Nikolay Chernyshevsky's What Is to Be Done?. The second part of the book is called "Àpropos of the Wet Snow", and describes certain events that, it seems, are destroying and sometimes renewing the underground man, who acts as a first person, unreliable narrator.

Book on Shelf (bottom): Notes from a Dead House, 1864
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Nov. 1821 – Feb.1881)
Note: The House of the Dead is a semi-auto biographical novel published in 1861-2 in the journal Vremya by Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky, which portrays the life of convicts in a Siberian prison camp. The novel has also been published under the titles Memoirs from the House of The Dead and Notes from the Dead House (or Notes from a Dead House). The book is a loosely-knit collection of facts, events and philosophical discussion organized by "theme" rather than as a continuous story. Dostoyevsky himself spent four years in exile in such a camp following his conviction for involvement in the Petrashevsky Circle. This experience allowed him to describe with great authenticity the conditions of prison life and the characters of the convicts.

 
 
 

The Body of the Dead Christ in the Tomb after Hans Holbein the Younger
Graphite on Panel
1.5” x 10"
2015
Note: This painted panel has attracted fascination and praise since it was created. The Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky was captivated by the work. In 1867, his wife had to drag her husband away from the panel lest its grip on him induce an epileptic fit. In his 1869 novel- The Idiot, the character Prince Myshkin, having viewed the painting in the home of Rogozhin, declares that it has the power to make the viewer lose his faith.

Book on shelf: The Idiot, 1868-69
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Nov. 1821 – Feb.1881)

 
 
 
Book on shelf: The Idiot, 1868-69
Fyodor Dostoyevsky (Nov. 1821 – Feb.1881)
Notes: The title is an ironic reference to the central character of the novel, Prince Lyov Nikolaevich Myshkin, a young man whose goodness and open-hearted simplicity lead many of the more worldly characters he encounters to mistakenly assume that he lacks intelligence and insight. In the character of Prince Myshkin, Dostoevsky set himself the task of depicting "the positively good and beautiful man"
 
 
 
Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin
Graphite on BFK RIVES Paper
122” x 92”
 
(Note: Most text notes are adapted excerpts from Wikipedia entries)
 
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